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Nutrient to Know: Vitamin E

You may know that antioxidants benefit your health, but how much do you know about them all? Where to get them? How much you need?

What is it?
Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin that helps protect cells from damage that may cause heart disease and certain types of cancer. Antioxidants work by blocking the action of free radicals, which are naturally occurring substances that damage cells throughout your body.

Why is it good for you?
Vitamin E has been linked to helping protect against prostate and colorectal cancer, but more research is pending on the long-term value. When it comes to heart health, vitamin E helps prevent cholesterol build up in your blood. It also helps boost your immunity and keep your skin and hair healthy.

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Nutrient to Know: Vitamin D

You may be up to speed on vitamin C and even know a bit about the various B vitamins, but what about vitamin D? Well, some are calling it the “super supplement.” Here is what you need to know.

What Is It?
Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means it needs fat to be absorbed by the body. This is one of the many reasons why it is important to have fat in your diet. In October 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics doubled the amount of vitamin D recommended for infants, children and adolescents (from 200 IU to 400 IU). This drastic change made many people take a closer look at this vitamin.

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Nutrient to Know: Vitamin C

Which has more vitamin C: a cup of broccoli or an orange? Get the answer and learn more about the benefits of this vitamin.

What Is It?
Vitamin C (a.k.a. ascorbic acid) is one of many water-soluble vitamins. Because our bodies don’t store water-solubles well, you should make vitamin C-rich foods part of your everyday diet to get a steady supply. You may also spot “ascorbic acid” in the ingredients on some packaged foods. It’s sometimes added to foods to help them maintain freshness and color.

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